QC Economics

All Economics Courses Courses

ECON100: Economics and Society
3 credits

A course designed for the nonmajor who wishes an introduction to economic reasoning and policy making. The major concepts of modern economics will be discussed along with applications of the theory to important contemporary problems such as inflation, recession, productivity, income distribution, economic concentration, and the U.S. role in the world economy. Accounting majors should take Economics 101. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have received credit for Economics 101.

ECON101: Introduction to Macroeconomics
3 credits

Covers the nature and methods of economics and survey of major economics problems; the determinants of national income and output, the price level, and employment; the role of money and banking in the economy; and the role of the government’s fiscal and monetary policies. May not be taken for credit if Economics 103 has already been taken.

ECON102: Introduction to Microeconomics
3 credits

How decisions are made by the consumer and producer sectors of the economy and the interactions between the two sectors; the process of resource allocation and income distribution within a free enterprise economy as well as alternative market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition; and the effects of various government policies on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. May not be taken for credit if Economics 104 has already been taken.

ECON103: The Global Economy
3 credits

The impact of globalization on consumers, workers, the structure of production, markets, and government and international regulation and economic strategies; the determinants of economic growth and development, the nature of international trade and finance, as well as the phenomena of inflation and unemployment; the changing structure of selected national economies. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 101 has already been taken.

ECON104: The Market Society
3 credits

A topic focused, problem-solving course on micro-oriented applications of economic reasoning. The laws of supply and demand are introduced in a framework that concentrates on how firms, consumers, investors and the government interact to produce relevant economic outcomes. Specific topics explored are instructor-specific; please check the syllabi of the relevant faculty for details. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 102 has already been taken.

ECON134W: Writing Tutorial
1 credits

A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-registration basis. This course works on writing that is relevant to the subject matter of the main course. Co-registration means that all students in the regular course will not necessarily be in the writing tutorial. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Tutorial satisfies one of the College’s writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

ECON135W: Economics Writing Workshop
1 credits

A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-requisite basis. This course works on writing that is integral to the subject matter of the main course. Co-requisite means that all students in the regular course will be in the writing workshop. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Workshop satisfies one of the College’s writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

ECON201: Macro-Economic Analysis (Formerly ECON206)
3 credits

National income measurement; macro-economic theories of income, employment, prices, and interest rates; public policies for growth and stabilization. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 226 has been taken (see also Economics 226).
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104

ECON201: Macro-Economic Analysis (Formerly ECON206)
3 credits

National income measurement; macro-economic theories of income, employment, prices, and interest rates; public policies for growth and stabilization. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 226 has been taken (see also Economics 226).
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104

ECON202: Price Theory (Formerly ECON205)
3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 credits

Familiarizes the student with the technical tools of economic analysis. Covers price, input and output decisions of the business firm; the forces behind supply of and demand for the product of the firm and industry; and the factors determining the distribution of income. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 225 has been taken (see also Economics 225).
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and Mathematics 131 or the equivalent

ECON202: Price Theory (Formerly ECON205)
3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 credits

Familiarizes the student with the technical tools of economic analysis. Covers price, input and output decisions of the business firm; the forces behind supply of and demand for the product of the firm and industry; and the factors determining the distribution of income. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 225 has been taken (see also Economics 225).
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and Mathematics 131 or the equivalent

ECON203: Development of Economic Thought
3 credits

Traces the evolution of economic doctrines both in their institutional context and with reference to central issues that are of present-day significance.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; English 110

ECON204: International Political Economy
3 credits

The important conceptual frameworks for considering the international political economy starting with mercantilism and ending with issues of international financial governance regime theories. Questions of property rights, state-market tensions, global public goods and bads, foreign direct investment and debt, structural adjustment programs and the creation of new financial architecture along with an examination of global economic governance institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization will be considered in the light of different approaches to the international political economy.
Sample Syllabus, Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103

ECON207: Comparative Economic and Financial Systems
3 credits

Despite the evolution of many world economies toward the market system and privatization, the major differences - formal, cultural, and informal - in the financial, legal, accounting, social and economic institutions, ownership, business practices and economic policy-making in both the transitioning economies and the world’s major economies pose major challenges for international business decision making and cause major differences in economic performance, income distribution, growth and efficiency of these economies. This course analyzes these components of an economy within a decision-making-information-motivation framework. Examples will be drawn from a number of economies including US, EU, Russia, Mexico, China and Pakistan. Of particular interest are macroeconomic institutions, monetary and fiscal policy, relationships to the world economic organizations as well as the internal political and legal frame work which influences privatization, market structures, competition and comparative internalization of social costs. Also examines the impact of systems and the political and social relationships in the behavior of economic institutions.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON208: The Process of Economic Development
3 credits

The causes of differences in the levels of economic performance among countries; major theories of economic development; policies for economic development.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON210: Transformation of Economic Systems
3 credits

This course is concerned with the breakup and reconstitution of economic systems from antiquity to the present. The emphasis will be on primitive, feudal, and contemporary underdeveloped economies.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON211: Economics of Asia
3 credits


Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of department; English 110

ECON212: Economics of Latin America
3 credits


Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of department; English 110

ECON213: Economics of the Labor Force
3 credits

Theoretical and public policy issues relating to wage determination, labor markets, the labor force, wages, prices, productivity, employment, human resources, and income maintenance.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON214: Economics of Organized Labor
3 credits

Includes collective bargaining in the public and private sectors and labor problems of minorities.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON215: Money and Banking
3 credits

Description and analysis of monetary and banking principles and institutions.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104

ECON217: Public Finance
3 credits

Such topics as government expenditures, distribution of the tax burden, equity in taxation, tax competition, and the national debt.
Prerequisites: Economics 205 or 225; English 110

ECON218: The Economics of State and Local Finance
3 credits

Such topics as the demand for government services, intergovernmental fiscal relations, the distribution of various public services within and between governmental jurisdictions, governmental budgeting processes, and sources of revenue.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON219: Economics of Class, Race, and Sex
3 credits

This course is concerned with theoretical and historical explanations of stratification by class, race, sex, and ethnicity. Specifically, it is concerned with explaining differential rates of progress among ethnic groups; the economic position of the black population versus the white one; black/white males vis-à-vis black
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103; English 110

ECON219W: Economics of Class, Race, and Sex
3 credits

This course is concerned with theoretical and historical explanations of stratification by class, race, sex, and ethnicity. Specifically, it is concerned with explaining differential rates of progress among ethnic groups; the economic position of the black population versus the white one; black/white males vis-à-vis black
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103; English 110

ECON220: Consumer Economics and Personal Finance
3 credits

This course covers personal financial planning, consumer decision making, present value theory, money management, and credit. Specific topics include: income taxes, investing and portfolio management, risk management (insurance), pensions, long-term family and estate planning, and the problems of information and transaction costs. Students learn to use a spreadsheet on the IBM PC to solve various case problems.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON221: The Economy of Greece
3 credits

This course will focus on the postwar structure and performance of the Greek economy. An examination of overall growth as well as growth of the agricultural, industrial, and service sectors will be pursued, taking into account the private-versus-public sector dichotomy. Special consideration will be given to external economic relations of Greece, its membership in the EEC, and balance of payments problems. The structural effects of external relations upon domestic development will be traced, dealing, for example, with migration and income distribution.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON222: European Economic History since 1750
3 credits

Emphasizes the processes and repercussions of industrialization.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON223: The Development of the American Economy to 1914
3 credits


Prerequisites: Prereq.: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON223W: The Development of the American Economy to 1914
3 credits


Prerequisites: Prereq.: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON224: American Economic History since 1914
credits


Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON225: Price Theory (Mathematics Emphasis)
3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 credits

Identical to Economics 202, except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 202 has been taken.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and Mathematics 132 or 143 or 152

ECON226: Macro-Economic Analysis (Mathematical Emphasis)
3 credits

Identical to Economics 201 except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 201 has been taken.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and Mathematics 132 or 143 or 152

ECON228: The Economics of the Environment
3 credits

The economic causes of environmental problems and the problems encountered in estimating the economic cost of environmental damages. Application of economic theory to establish the conditions for the best use of the environment, and to evaluate economic costs and benefits of current regulatory policy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; English 110

ECON228W: The Economics of the Environment
3 credits

The economic causes of environmental problems and the problems encountered in estimating the economic cost of environmental damages. Application of economic theory to establish the conditions for the best use of the environment, and to evaluate economic costs and benefits of current regulatory policy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; English 110

ECON229: History of International Business and Finance, 1850 to the Present
3 credits

This course will study the evolution of typical international business and financial structures and their performance through readings and lectures on international enterprise and national economic histories from the first era of globalization to the present. The business of export-import, financing trade and international investment, and multinational enterprise will be covered. Other topics will include the evolution of international monetary systems, trade regulation, and the size of the international economy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104

ECON230: Women's Issues in Economics
3 credits

Includes discussion of participation of women in the labor force; distribution of women among occupations; work outside the marketplace and in the home; wage differentials between men and women; and government policies that affect the economic position of women.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON230W: Women's Issues in Economics
3 credits

Includes discussion of participation of women in the labor force; distribution of women among occupations; work outside the marketplace and in the home; wage differentials between men and women; and government policies that affect the economic position of women.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON231: Economic Development of China
3 credits

This is a basic survey course on China's economic development from a historical perspective. After a short review of some of China's pre-1949 economic history, the course focuses on the People's Republic, with roughly half the semester devoted to the period of Mao's leadership (1949-1976) and the balance devoted to the post-Mao period of reform and transition to a market economy (1978-present).
Prerequisites: MATH 131 and ECON 101 or 103 and ECON 102 or 104 and ENGL110

ECON231: Economic Development of China
3 credits

This is a basic survey course on China's economic development from a historical perspective. After a short review of some of China's pre-1949 economic history, the course focuses on the People's Republic, with roughly half the semester devoted to the period of Mao's leadership (1949-1976) and the balance devoted to the post-Mao period of reform and transition to a market economy (1978-present).
Prerequisites: MATH 131 and ECON 101 or 103 and ECON 102 or 104 and ENGL110

ECON242: Regulation of American Business
3 credits

The origin, evaluation, and present pattern of government regulation of business; the organization of industry; anti-trust and the promotion of competition and prevention of monopoly and public regulation; public policies in natural resource and environmental conservation.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON246: Urban Economics
3 credits

The microeconomics of U. S. urban development patterns from the industrial revolution to the present. Decentralization of economic activity and population; the resulting urban problems and possible solutions to these problems.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; English 110

ECON249: Statistics as Applied to Economics and Business
3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 credits

The topics covered are descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, sampling statistical inference, estimation, and simple correlation and regression. (Not open to students with credit for Mathematics 241, which will be accepted in lieu of Economics 249.)
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and Mathematics 131 or equivalent

ECON260: Economics of Health and Income Maintenance Program
3 credits

This course analyzes both individual and public policy decisions surrounding health and resource allocation issues in the health care sector of the U.S. The demand, production, cost, and financing of health are examined using a variety of conceptual and empirical models. Income maintenance programs are also discussed. The main emphasis is on the United States; comparisons with other countries may also be included.

ECON326: International Economics
3 credits

An introduction to the theory of international trade and to empirical tests of trade theory.
Prerequisites: Economics 205 or 225

ECON328: International Finance
3 credits

An analysis of the economics of balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, international liquidity and adjustment problems, exchange rate systems and their influence on internal and external balance, international financial institutions, international capital movements, financial problems of economic integration.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104and 206 or 226; English 110

ECON340: Industrial Organization
3 credits

The economic functions of business firms; the theory and practice of internal organization of firms; market structure and performance of competitors, oligopolists, etc., and their effects on economic welfare; business as a social and political institution; the large firm in a mixed economy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and ECON202; English 110

ECON340: Industrial Organization
3 credits

The economic functions of business firms; the theory and practice of internal organization of firms; market structure and performance of competitors, oligopolists, etc., and their effects on economic welfare; business as a social and political institution; the large firm in a mixed economy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and ECON202; English 110

ECON382: Introduction to Econometrics
3 lecture hr.; 1 lab hr.; 3 credits

This course will begin with a review of statistics and hypothesis testing, then introduce simple and multiple regression techniques; the estimation of regression using ordinary least squares; inference; and the use of spreadsheets and statistical software to estimate economic models.
Prerequisites: Math 131 or equivalent and Economics 249 or equivalent.

ECON383: Seminar in Selected Studies in Economics
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 102 and Economics 249 or equivalent.
Semesters Offered: Fall 2010

ECON383W: Seminar in Selected Studies in Business
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and Economics 102; English 110
Semesters Offered: Fall 2010

ECON390: Research Methods in Economics
3 credits

Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 205 or 225, 206 or 226, 249

ECON390W: Research Methods in Economics
3 credits

Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 205 or 225, 206 or 226, 249

ECON391: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

ECON391W: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

ECON392W: Honors Seminar
3 credits

This class is required for High Honors Students in Economics. Class size is limited to 20. The course will cover use of data sources, literature searches, analysis of data, presentation and interpretation of research results, and the process of writing and revision for economists.
Prerequisites: Economics ECO 205 or 225, Eco 382 or Bus 384, two of the following three courses, ECO 206 or 226, 215, 328, and permission of the department

ECON393: Intenship for Economics
3 credits

Economics majors are given the opportunity to do a supervised internship in an appropriate corporate, not-for-profit, research organization, small business or governmental organization. Internships are subject to the approval of the Internship Director, and approval must be sought a minimum of one month prior to the internship. The internship should be a minimum of 8 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students must meet periodically during the internship with the Internship Director. The student must write a report on his or her internship. While the Department will endeavor to find an appropriate internship, often in the not-for-profit sector, students may also locate a potential internship and submit it to the Internship Director for approval.
Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits including Eco 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and two additional economics courses

ECON703: Price and Distribution Theory
2 hr. plus conference; 3 credits

One-semester course in microeconomic theory.

ECON705: Mathematical Economics
3 credits

An introduction to applications of mathematics to economic theory and problems. Illustrations are drawn from linear programming, theory of games, and difference equations.
Prerequisites: A one-semester course in differential calculus and a course in price theory; and either graduate matriculation or permission of the Chair

ECON711: Money and Capital Markets
2 hr. plus conference; 3 credits

Examination of the sources and uses of funds in financial markets; market structure of interest rates; flow-of-funds analysis.

ECON715: Corporate Finance
2 hr. plus conference; 3 credits

The theory of investor and firm behavior in financial markets under uncertainty. Among the topics discussed are portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, asset valuation theory, and optimum firm decision-making rules with regard to capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy.
Prerequisites: Economics 241 or equivalent

ECON721: Econometrics
2 hr. plus conference; 3 credits

Analysis of the classic single equation regression models (simple and multiple), simultaneous equation models, and special problems associated with time series and qualitative data.
Prerequisites: One semester of calculus and Economics 249 or equivalent

HNRS226: Honors College Seminar
4 credits

Shaping the Future of New York in the 21st Century: The Political Economy of New York City. Enrollment is limited to CUNY Honors College students.