QC Economics

300 Level Courses

Economics

ECON326: International Economics
3 credits

An introduction to the theory of international trade and to empirical tests of trade theory.
Prerequisites: Economics 205 or 225

ECON328: International Finance
3 credits

An analysis of the economics of balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, international liquidity and adjustment problems, exchange rate systems and their influence on internal and external balance, international financial institutions, international capital movements, financial problems of economic integration.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104and 206 or 226; English 110

ECON340: Industrial Organization
3 credits

The economic functions of business firms; the theory and practice of internal organization of firms; market structure and performance of competitors, oligopolists, etc., and their effects on economic welfare; business as a social and political institution; the large firm in a mixed economy.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and ECON202; English 110

ECON382: Introduction to Econometrics
3 lecture hr.; 1 lab hr.; 3 credits

This course will begin with a review of statistics and hypothesis testing, then introduce simple and multiple regression techniques; the estimation of regression using ordinary least squares; inference; and the use of spreadsheets and statistical software to estimate economic models.
Prerequisites: Math 131 or equivalent and Economics 249 or equivalent.

ECON383: Seminar in Selected Studies in Economics
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 102 and Economics 249 or equivalent.
Semesters Offered: Fall 2010

ECON383W: Seminar in Selected Studies in Business
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and Economics 102; English 110
Semesters Offered: Fall 2010

ECON390: Research Methods in Economics
3 credits

Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 205 or 225, 206 or 226, 249

ECON390W: Research Methods in Economics
3 credits

Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 205 or 225, 206 or 226, 249

ECON391: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

ECON391W: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

ECON392W: Honors Seminar
3 credits

This class is required for High Honors Students in Economics. Class size is limited to 20. The course will cover use of data sources, literature searches, analysis of data, presentation and interpretation of research results, and the process of writing and revision for economists.
Prerequisites: Economics ECO 205 or 225, Eco 382 or Bus 384, two of the following three courses, ECO 206 or 226, 215, 328, and permission of the department

ECON393: Intenship for Economics
3 credits

Economics majors are given the opportunity to do a supervised internship in an appropriate corporate, not-for-profit, research organization, small business or governmental organization. Internships are subject to the approval of the Internship Director, and approval must be sought a minimum of one month prior to the internship. The internship should be a minimum of 8 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students must meet periodically during the internship with the Internship Director. The student must write a report on his or her internship. While the Department will endeavor to find an appropriate internship, often in the not-for-profit sector, students may also locate a potential internship and submit it to the Internship Director for approval.
Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits including Eco 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and two additional economics courses

Accounting

ACCT305: Cost Accounting
3 hr.; 2 credits

The concepts and procedures used to account for the cost of manufacturing and selling, with their practical application in different types of cost accumulation systems (i.e., job-order costing, process costing, joint product costing, standard costing, and direct costing).
Prerequisites: Accounting 201 and junior standing

ACCT306: Quantitative Techniques in Planning and Control
4 hr.; 3 credits

The application of quantitative and programming techniques in managerial decision making, including probability analysis, mathematical programming, network models, queuing theory, Monte Carlo simulation, and regression/correlation analysis, inventory models, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisites: Accounting 305, Economics 241, Economics 249, and junior standing

ACCT311: Advanced Accounting
4 hr.; 3 credits

Theory of accounting applicable to problems peculiar to large-scale business operations, including the problems of accounting for installment sales, consignment sales, branch operations, mergers, insolvencies, liquidations, and the preparation of consolidated financial reports. Relevant opinions and statements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC.
Prerequisites: Accounting 202 and junior standing

ACCT350: Financial Statement Analysis
3 credits

Analysis is made of financial statements from the perspective of users and preparers of financial reports including investors, creditors, auditors, accountants, and management. Financial statements and related disclosures will be analyzed to gain a perspective on the company’s health.
Prerequisites: Accounting 202

ACCT355: Accounting in International Environment
3 credits

This advanced-level course takes up the accounting, tax, and control problems and procedures arising from the flow of goods, services, money, and investments across national frontiers.
Prerequisites: Accounting 306

ACCT361: HAS NOW BEEN RENAMED ACCT261 - Business Law I
3 credits

Introduction to the law. Seeks to provide majors and nonmajors with an understanding of the law and the social forces that shape it. The basic structure through which law is implemented and enforced is reviewed, in addition to the specific rules of law relating to contracts, trusts, and estates.
Prerequisites: Junior standing.

ACCT367: Federal and New York State Taxes
4 credits

An introduction to the federal income tax as it relates to individuals. Particular emphasis is given to the basic multi-tiered tax structure. The underlying concepts of basis, inclusion, exclusion, deduction, are defined, utilizing the Internal Revenue Code and related material. Special classes of taxpayers including partnerships, estates, trusts, corporations of various types, and foreign taxpayers are considered as well as accounting and procedural rules.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and senior standing

Business

BUS341W: Intermediate Finance
3 credits

Covers the five most important problems of modern finance at a level beyond Economics 241. These are: the relationship between risk and returns, as expressed in the Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory; the valuation of debt and equity instruments; the cost of capital and optimal capital structure; capital budgeting; and dividend policy.
Prerequisites: Business 241, Business 160W, and Economics 249 or permission of the instructor; English 110

BUS344: Marketing Research (formerly ECON344)
3 credits

A study of the nature of scientific research methods applied to the solution of marketing problems. Emphasis on planning projects and formulating the problem; methods of gathering data, including applications of sampling; interpreting data; and presentation of the results. Some attention is given to a discussion of the essential features of the applied areas of motivation research, advertising research, product research, and sales research.
Prerequisites: ECON 243 and 249

BUS350: Investment Analysis
3 credits

An analysis of the types of securities available in the market covering both individual and institutional portfolio analyses and management. Considers the formulation of appropriate portfolio investment objectives, techniques for achieving them, and institutional, legal, and other constraints on portfolio strategies. Impacts of macro- and micro-economic activity on portfolio performance, and measures of performance are discussed.
Prerequisites: Business 241 or permission of instructor; ECON249 or equivalent, and English 110

BUS351: Financial Markets
3 credits

Survey of the United States and international money and capital markets. Emphasis is on modern institutions and practices. The course also considers the analytics and consequences of recent trading techniques.
Prerequisites: Business 241 or permission of instructor and MATH131 or equivalent

BUS352: Investment Management
3 credits

This course provides a detailed examination of portfolio management. Topics include: definition and measurement of risk, market efficiency, testing for inefficiencies, components and determinants of trading costs, mechanics of creating and managing a portfolio and investment philosophies.
Prerequisites: Business 350

BUS353: Options and Futures Markets
3 credits

The economic role of options and futures markets is examined. Specific topics include: determinants of forward and futures prices, option valuation using binominal trees and Monte Carlo simulation, implied binominal trees, relation between puts and calls, uses of options in investment strategies, hedging techniques, exotic options, applications to corporate securities and other financial instruments.
Prerequisites: Business 241 and Economics 249

BUS354: Multinational Financial Management
3 credits

This course studies the various issues impacting multinational corporations and their international financial management. The course deals with the significance of a country’s balance of payments deficits and surpluses; the markets for foreign exchange; exchange rate determination and volatility; methods to deal with currency fluctuations; currency bloc such as the European Monetary Union; the decision-making process concerning location and financing of production and investments; methods of assessing country risk; international taxation issues.
Prerequisites: Business 241

BUS355: Topics in International Business and Finance
3 credits

This capstone course is designed to develop the student’s skill in systematically analyzing and presenting solutions to various problems presented in the case studies in international business, bringing to bear the theory and information learned in previous course. The student will write 4 or 5 “briefing papers” during the semester. Topics vary from semester to semester and include topics such as assessing barriers to trade, risk management in foreign investment, a plan for a feasibility study of setting up an plant abroad, developing a marketing plan for foreign country, problems in evaluating foreign companies for purchase or business partner, evaluating and hedging of currency risks, and assessing political and economic policy risks.
Prerequisites: Economics 328 and 326

BUS383: Seminar in Selected Studies in Economics
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 102 and Economics 249 or equivalent.

BUS383W: Seminar in Selected Studies in Business
3 credits

Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and Economics 102; English 110

BUS384: Forecasting and Regression Analysis for Business
3 credits

A survey of macroeconomic and microeconomic forecasting techniques. Emphasis will be placed on multiple regression analysis and the application of regression techniques to problems in finance and economics.
Prerequisites: Economics 249 or equivalent

BUS385: CFA Workshop
1 credits

Course is intended to prepare students for the Level I CFA exam.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of/co-registration with finance courses

BUS386: Financial Econometrics
3 hr., 3 credits

The course will introduce students to methods of empirical analysis of financial markets. It will cover modern statistical and econometric techniques necessary for both professional and academic quantitative research in finance. Particular emphasis will be placed on measuring risk of holding and trading financial assets. Topics include: autoregressive and moving average models, ARCH, GARCH, analysis of high frequency intraday financial data.
Prerequisites: ECON 382 or BUS 384; and MATH 241 or permission by the instructor.

BUS391: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in business under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)
Prerequisites: Permission of department; English 110

BUS391W: Special Problems
391.1-391.3, 1-3 hr.; 1-3 credits

Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in business under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)
Prerequisites: Permission of department; English 110

BUS392W: Honors Seminar
3 hr 2 credits

This class is required for High Honors Students in Finance and International Business. Class size is limited to 20. The course will cover use of data sources, literature searches, analysis of data, presentation and interpretation of research results, and the process of writing and revision.
Prerequisites: Bus 341W, 350, 351 (for Finance majors) OR ECO 328, 326 and 355W (for International Business Majors) and ECO 382 or BUS 384 and permission of the department

BUS393: Internship for Business Administration
3 credits

This course gives economics majors the opportunity to do a supervised internship in an appropriate corporate, not-for-profit, research organization, small business or governmental organization. Internships are subject to the approval of the Internship Director, and approval must be sought a minimum of one month prior to the internship. The internship should be a minimum of 8 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students must meet periodically during the internship with the Internship Director. The student must write a report on his or her internship. While the Department will endeavor to find an appropriate internship, often in the not-for-profit sector, students may also locate a potential internship and submit it to the Internship Director for approval.
Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits including Eco 101 and 102, Accounting 101 and 102 and two other required courses in the BBA program

Other Departments

ANTH302: Ecology and Culture
3 credits

This seminar focuses on the question, "Why do cultures change?". Taking ethnographic and archaeological examples of foragers, herders, and farmers, the class will examine the relationship between environmental change, human population growth, technological change, the organization of the economy, and the exercise of power.
Prerequisites: Nine credits in anthropology and junior standing

ANTH304: Anthropology of Development
3 credits

Third world and indigenous peoples are being incorporated more fully into the modern world system by means of processes generally labeled as “development.” Through an examination of several cases, this course will analyze the economic, political, cultural, demographic, and ecological impacts of this process.
Prerequisites: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as prerequisites or corequisites or permission of instructor