QC Economics

100 Level Courses

Economics

ECON100: Economics and Society
3 credits

A course designed for the nonmajor who wishes an introduction to economic reasoning and policy making. The major concepts of modern economics will be discussed along with applications of the theory to important contemporary problems such as inflation, recession, productivity, income distribution, economic concentration, and the U.S. role in the world economy. Accounting majors should take Economics 101. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have received credit for Economics 101.

ECON101: Introduction to Macroeconomics
3 credits

Covers the nature and methods of economics and survey of major economics problems; the determinants of national income and output, the price level, and employment; the role of money and banking in the economy; and the role of the governmentís fiscal and monetary policies. May not be taken for credit if Economics 103 has already been taken.

ECON102: Introduction to Microeconomics
3 credits

How decisions are made by the consumer and producer sectors of the economy and the interactions between the two sectors; the process of resource allocation and income distribution within a free enterprise economy as well as alternative market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition; and the effects of various government policies on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. May not be taken for credit if Economics 104 has already been taken.

ECON103: The Global Economy
3 credits

The impact of globalization on consumers, workers, the structure of production, markets, and government and international regulation and economic strategies; the determinants of economic growth and development, the nature of international trade and finance, as well as the phenomena of inflation and unemployment; the changing structure of selected national economies. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 101 has already been taken.

ECON104: The Market Society
3 credits

A topic focused, problem-solving course on micro-oriented applications of economic reasoning. The laws of supply and demand are introduced in a framework that concentrates on how firms, consumers, investors and the government interact to produce relevant economic outcomes. Specific topics explored are instructor-specific; please check the syllabi of the relevant faculty for details. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 102 has already been taken.

ECON134W: Writing Tutorial
1 credits

A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-registration basis. This course works on writing that is relevant to the subject matter of the main course. Co-registration means that all students in the regular course will not necessarily be in the writing tutorial. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Tutorial satisfies one of the Collegeís writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

ECON135W: Economics Writing Workshop
1 credits

A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-requisite basis. This course works on writing that is integral to the subject matter of the main course. Co-requisite means that all students in the regular course will be in the writing workshop. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Workshop satisfies one of the Collegeís writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

Accounting

ACCT101: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting I
4 hr.; 3 credits

First course for accounting majors. Also gives nonmajors a fundamental understanding of the language of business as expressed in financial reports.
Prerequisites: Upper freshman standing

ACCT102: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting II
4 hr.; 3 credits

Continuation of Accounting 101
Prerequisites: Accounting 101 and sophomore standing

Business

BUS105: Economic Foundations
3 credits

Economic principles and relationships that serve as the foundation for many of the valuation tools used in finance. The first half of the course develops the microeconomics behind classic valuation theory, equilibrium pricing, and decisionmaking under uncertainty. The second half covers topics in international macroeconomics including interest rate determination and monetary policy, foreign exchange rates, money and banking, and international capital flows and financial crises.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 131, 141, or 151

BUS160W: Introduction to Business Writing
3 hr., 3 credits

Study of the role of communication as a variable defining, organizing, mediating, and affecting the outcomes of interactions within organization environments. Introduction to and mastery of basic oral formats and non-verbal communication techniques likely to be useful as a participant in corporate organizations. Some sections of this course will be limited to students enrolled in the Business and Liberal Arts minor and some sections of this course will be limited to students admitted to the major in business administration.

Mathematics

MATH116: Mathematics of Finance
3 hr.; 3 credits

Topics include simple interest, compound interest, mortgages, bonds, depreciation, annuities, and life insurance. This course may be counted toward the LASAR Scientific Methodology and Quantitative Reasoning requirement.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 110 or knowledge of intermediate algebra.

MATH122: Precalculus
4 credits

This course offers a thorough introduction to the topics required for calculus. Topics include: real and complex numbers, algebra of functions, the fundamental theorem of algebra, trigonometry, logarithms and exponential functions, conic sections, and the use of graphic calculators. Students unsure of their preparation for calculus are advised to take the Queens College mathematics placement test.
Prerequisites: Three years of high school math

MATH131: Calculus with Applications to the Social Sciences I
3 credits

The first part of a two-semester sequence (Mathematics 131 and 132) intended to introduce the fundamental ideas and techniques of the calculus to nonscience students. Special emphasis is given to applications. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Topics include functions and graphs; derivatives and differentiation techniques; the marginal concept in economics; optimization methods; compound interest; exponential and logarithmic functions. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department

MATH132: Calculus with Applications to the Social Sciences II
3 hr.; 3 credits

A continuation of Mathematics 131. Topics include integrals and integration techniques; applications of integrals to statistics via probability densities; consumerís and producerís surplus; elementary differential equations; functions of several variables; optimization methods; Lagrange multipliers; multiple integrals.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 131

MATH141: Calculus/Differentiation
3 credits

The first part of a three-semester sequence (Mathematics 141, 142, 143), covering the same material as Mathematics 151 and 152. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 151.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department

MATH142: Calculus/Integration
3 credits

A continuation of Mathematics 141. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 151.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 100 or 141

MATH143: Calculus/Infinite Series
3 credits

A continuation of Mathematics 142. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 152.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 142. Mathematics 151 does not satisfy the prerequisite

MATH151: Calculus/Differentiation & Integration
4 credits

The first part of a two-semester sequence (Mathematics 151 and 152) intended for students who want to study mathematics, physics, chemistry, or engineering. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Students who want a less rapid introduction to calculus should take Mathematics 141. Topics include sets, inequalities, straight lines, circles, functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, formulas of differentiation, implicit differentiation, velocity, acceleration, maxima and minima, Rolleís theorem, the mean value theorem, points of inflection, curve sketching, antiderivatives. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 141.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department

MATH152: Calculus/Integration & Infinite Series
4 credits

Deals with several aspects of differential and integral calculus. Among the topics studied are the definite integral, applications of the definite integral, the differentiation of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, and expansions of functions. Applications to problems of geometry and physics. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 142.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 151

MATH157: Honors Calculus I, II (MATH157 and 158)
4 hr.; 4 credits

Intensive course that is the first year of a two-year sequence (Mathematics 157, 158, 207, 208) that will cover elementary and advanced calculus. A rigorous treatment of calculus from a modern point of view is given. The best mathematics students are urged to take this course. Students taking this course can receive advanced placement credit for calculus courses taken in high school. Not open, without permission of the department Chair, to students who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.
Prerequisites: Permission of Chair.

MATH158: Honors Calculus I, II (MATH157 and 158)
4 hr.; 4 credits

Intensive course that is the first year of a two-year sequence (Mathematics 157, 158, 207, 208) that will cover elementary and advanced calculus. A rigorous treatment of calculus from a modern point of view is given. The best mathematics students are urged to take this course. Students taking this course can receive advanced placement credit for calculus courses taken in high school. Not open, without permission of the department Chair, to students who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.
Prerequisites: Permission of Chair.

Other Departments

CSCI018: CSCI048, "Spreadsheet Programming" is replacing CSCI018, "Computing for Business" in the BBA curriculum
2 lec., 2 lab. hr.; 3 credits

Fundamentals of using the operating system and application software. Business-oriented uses of software applications including: word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database management. Emphasis on realistic situations and problem solving strategies used in business. An important part of the course is a research project/presentation of topics involving current issues arising from the use of computer technology in a business environment. Some sections will be limited to those admitted to the major in business administration, and others will be limited to those admitted to the minor in Business and Liberal Arts (BALA).
Sample Syllabus,

CSCI048: Spreasheet Programming
2 lec., 2 lab. hr.; 3 credits

In-depth introduction to spreadsheets as an effective tool for the organization, processing, and analysis of numerical information in such areas as business, finance, engineering, natural and social sciences. Topics include: basic cell operation, text manipulation, formulas, functions, arrays, circular references, charting techniques, pivot tables, conditional formatting, and VBA programming.
Prerequisites: one Math course numbered 110 or higher

ENGL110: College Writing
4 hr., 3 credits

The arts and practices of effective writing and reading in college, especially the use of language to discover ideas. Methods of research and documentation will be taught, along with some introduction to rhetorical purposes and strategies. Students will spend one hour per week conferring with each other or with the instructor about their writing.

GEOL025: Natural Resources and the Environment
3 credits

World distribution, production, and requirements for mineral and energy resources. Use, abuse, conservation, and pollution of resources.

HIST106: History of Latin America, 1825 to the Present
3 credits

Survey from the wars of independence to the present; special attention to political concepts, foreign imperialism, social and economic problems.

HIST145: Modern South Asia
3 credits

History of the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The development of colonialism in India, anti-colonial movements, the partition of the subcontinent, the experience of women in colonial and post-colonial South Asia, the interplay between religion and national identity, and modern popular culture.

PHIL104: PHIL160, "Business Ethics" is replacing PHIL104, "Introduction to Ethics" in the BBA curriculum
3 credits

An investigation of rival theories concerning moral goodness, rightness, happiness, freedom and responsibility. Selected readings from classical and contemporary sources.

PHIL160: Business Ethics
3 credits

An investigation of rival theories concerning moral goodness, rightness, happiness, freedom and responsibility. Selected readings from classical and contemporary sources.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 and 102